Cleopatra

Cleopatra The Pulitzer Prize winning biographer brings to life the most intriguing woman in the history of the world Cleopatra the last queen of Egypt Her palace shimmered with onyx garnets and gold but was

  • Title: Cleopatra
  • Author: Stacy Schiff
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 374
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • The Pulitzer Prize winning biographer brings to life the most intriguing woman in the history of the world Cleopatra, the last queen of Egypt.Her palace shimmered with onyx, garnets, and gold, but was richer still in political and sexual intrigue Above all else, Cleopatra was a shrewd strategist and an ingenious negotiator.Though her life spanned fewer than forty years,The Pulitzer Prize winning biographer brings to life the most intriguing woman in the history of the world Cleopatra, the last queen of Egypt.Her palace shimmered with onyx, garnets, and gold, but was richer still in political and sexual intrigue Above all else, Cleopatra was a shrewd strategist and an ingenious negotiator.Though her life spanned fewer than forty years, it reshaped the contours of the ancient world She was married twice, each time to a brother She waged a brutal civil war against the first when both were teenagers She poisoned the second Ultimately she dispensed with an ambitious sister as well incest and assassination were family specialties Cleopatra appears to have had sex with only two men They happen, however, to have been Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, among the most prominent Romans of the day Both were married to other women Cleopatra had a child with Caesar and after his murder three with his prot g Already she was the wealthiest ruler in the Mediterranean the relationship with Antony confirmed her status as the most influential woman of the age The two would together attempt to forge a new empire, in an alliance that spelled their ends Cleopatra has lodged herself in our imaginations ever since.Famous long before she was notorious, Cleopatra has gone down in history for all the wrong reasons Shakespeare and Shaw put words in her mouth Michelangelo, Tiepolo, and Elizabeth Taylor put a face to her name Along the way, Cleopatra s supple personality and the drama of her circumstances have been lost In a masterly return to the classical sources, Stacy Schiff here boldly separates fact from fiction to rescue the magnetic queen whose death ushered in a new world order Rich in detail, epic in scope, Schiff s is a luminous, deeply original reconstruction of a dazzling life.

    • Cleopatra BY Stacy Schiff
      374 Stacy Schiff
    • thumbnail Title: Cleopatra BY Stacy Schiff
      Posted by:Stacy Schiff
      Published :2019-06-12T12:16:40+00:00


    About “Stacy Schiff

    • Stacy Schiff

      Stacy Schiff is the author of V ra Mrs Vladimir Nabokov , winner of the Pulitzer Prize Saint Exup ry, a Pulitzer Prize finalist and A Great Improvisation Franklin, France, and the Birth of America, winner of the George Washington Book Prize, the Ambassador Award in American Studies, and the Gilbert Chinard Prize of the Institut Fran ais d Am rique All three were New York Times Notable Books the Los Angeles Times Book Review, the Chicago Tribune, and The Economist also named A Great Improvisation a Best Book of the Year The biographies have been published in a host of foreign editions.Schiff has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities and was a Director s Fellow at the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library She was awarded a 2006 Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters Schiff has written for The New Yorker, the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, and the Boston Globe, among other publications She lives in New York City.



    247 thoughts on “Cleopatra

    • First and foremost this is a history book. The plot is taken from real time 2,000 years ago. It hasn't been bloated with fantastical elements or intense drama. In fact, if you were reading this book as you would a work of fiction, you'll find yourself sadly lacking that same kind of connection to Cleopatra as you would to a main character in a novel. Why? Because Cleopatra is nearly unknowable. And she's not a fictional character. She's spoken of from a distance, seen more through the eyes of me [...]


    • So far, I am very disappointed in this book--by a Pulitzer Prize winning author. She uses very long paragraphs that should have been divided. She puts her points embedded so that it's hard for a reader to see what she intends to be significant. There are "clever" pieces that are not at all clever. The author says she will not create material but may create context from other sources, but she does not give the reader cues. For example, in Chapter II she goes on and on about Cleopatra's education, [...]


    • Beginning a month (or forty days) of biographies, I thought I would work through this buddy read. In her biography of Cleopatra, Schiff takes the reader along a winding adventure into the world before the Common Era, where actions to unite came at the cost of land and life, both bloody endeavours. Born into the Ptolemaic dynasty that ruled Egypt, Cleopatra was of Macedonia Greek origin at a time of much political and geographic change. Her family ruled over the region with an iron fist and would [...]


    • Stacy Schiff has a serious girl crush on Cleopatra. If you want to read 300 pages about how awesome Queen Cleo was, then this is the book for you!I remembered little about the famous Egyptian ruler from world history class in high school, and I don't think the Elizabeth Taylor movie counts as a documentary, so Schiff's book felt like my introduction to Cleopatra. The book covers her family, her childhood, her education, her ability to charm and manipulate, her relationships with Julius Caesar an [...]


    • Stacy Schiff's Cleopatra: A Life is speculative, borderline revisionist history. It is unabashedly pro-Cleopatra, and ya know what? That's okay!Schiff looks at all the historical accounts - many of which did not paint the Egyptian queen in a kindly light - and attempts to distort the image so that the portrait favors her subject much more than history has. For all that, Schiff offers sound speculation. Her what-ifs and perhapses chime with the ring of truth. After all, history is written by the [...]


    • Perhaps of all the historic characters we think we know, but don’t, Cleopatra ranks at the top of the list. Sometimes a legend is so well-known that we lose track of the fact that a real human being was living this story, fighting these battles, and harboring these emotions. What an extraordinary person she must have been to have lived through so much in her short thirty-nine years and to have influenced history in the way that she did. First fact that I did not know. She was Cleopatra VII. Th [...]


    • freshofftheshelf/The number one thing that I learned from Cleopatra: A Life was this: I had deceived myself in thinking I knew anything about her before reading this book. Stacy Schiff digs deep into the life of one of the most well-known, yet misunderstood women in history. Most of us know her as the Egyptian queen who had affairs/children with both Caesar and Mark Antony, the two most powerful men of their age. She herself was much, much more than that.Cleopatra was a fabulously rich woman. In [...]


    • Released to rave reviews and the full packaging monty of its publisher, Stacy Schiff’s Cleopatra took the NYT by storm in 2011, remaining there for months. And no wonder! This kamikaze of masterly writing, meticulous and thorough research, and humanizing hand of the author did a spectacular job of unmasking the woman behind the myth and debunking the lies we today call slander.This is the biography of Queen Cleopatra VII Philopator (as the title implies) but it is done unlike any other. (PLEAS [...]


    • What I learned from this book (in no particular order): 1. Cleo was an insatiable vamp who seduced two of the most powerful men in Rome using her feminine wiles. Cleo might have used her wiles to seduce them, but both Julius and Mark were hardly paragons of chastity themselves: Julius specialized in seducing “aristocratic wives”, while Mark had numerous affairs with both single and married women.2. Cleo looked like Elizabeth Taylor with too much mascara. We just don’t really know how she l [...]


    • "When Egypt Ruled the East" by George Steindorff this book is not.I have read many books on Egyptian history all the way up through the Ptolemies who, somehow, through some sort of rhetorical magic, were made to be as dry and dull as dead leaves in winter in "Cleopatra: A Life." I have read many history books. I consider myself a bit of a connoisseur of the genre. I even inhale historical fiction. Some of these books have been utter and complete crap. I have manned up and finished books that wou [...]


    • I picked Stacy Schiff's Cleopatra: A Life biography off the library's new releases shelf because 1) I recently realized that I hadn't read a biography since Plutarch's Greek Lives, maybe a decade ago and 2) the latest National Geographic had a cool article on the subject. Cleopatra: A Life was strong, full of detail and suspense, but evidenced some of what keeps me away from biographies in the first place.I get the sense biography, like all writing, I suppose, is about choices. How will the biog [...]


    • Stacy Schiff has crafted, somehow, a new angle on one of the world's oldest great stories. By focusing on the first degree sources we have from the period (mostly from Roman scholars & historians, since Alexandria was destroyed by earthquakes), Schiff at once claims expertise but only in a context that is also accessible to the reader. At times Schiff's explanation of the sources and the perceived motivations of their authors feels plodding, but the framing of these sources is essential to S [...]


    • Disappointed in this. Was really looking forward to it after it made so many Top 10 of 2010 lists, but I was sufficiently underwhelmed. Subject matter really interested me, so I would have been very forgiving, but this book jumped all over the place. One criticism I had read was that the author takes a lot of liberties based on her exhaustive research, some of which are just silly. Concur. February and March are insanely busy and I usually find little time to read during these months, but even b [...]


    • Reading the introduction I realize what a monumental project writing a biography of Cleopatra must have been for Schiff. Sources are questionable and rare, many dating hundreds of years after the events occurred. Cleopatra was a sensation during her lifetime. A diplomat, economist, politician, fashion plate, and "outsize personality", Cleopatra built an empire throughout the Mediterranean region. With the help of Julius Caesar, at the age of 21 Cleopatra won both her throne and her citizens back [...]


    • "In one of the busiest afterlives in history she has gone on to become an asteroid, a video game, a cliché, a cigarette, a slot machine, a strip club, a synonym for Elizabeth Taylor. Shakespeare attested to Cleopatra's infinite variety. He had no idea." In the opening pages of CLEOPATRA: A LIFE, Stacy Schiff sets the tone for what is to follow, and frankly, I found it all, from the first page to the last, to be utterly and sublimely intoxicating. Schiff's reverence for Cleopatra and the umbrage [...]


    • I was very disappointed by this book, the primary reason being the author’s very choppy style. I found the style made it extremely hard to read with no flow to the narrative. Her style used strange placements of the basic sentence elements (I much prefer subject, verb, object order), a plethora of semi-colons and dashes, odd adverbs (use of “as well” and “too” when “also” would have been more appropriate), and multiple short sentences following each other when proper connectors wou [...]


    • I labelled this one as "feministy," because I don't think that Stacy Schiff could deny her "let's re-examine Cleopatra's ACTUAL awesomeness as opposed to this hyper-sexualized harpy-witch-seductress-harlot nonsense" angle. Pulitzer Prize-winning past or no, Schiff delivers fluff here. Good fluff, feminist as opposed to misogynistic fluff, but fluff nonetheless. Grad school is starting to ruin me for reading things that aren't in academic journals; after Schiff would state a presumed fact, my int [...]


    • The number one most read and liked review of this book on this site is completely off-base and this review is pretty much going to be a defense of Cleopatra in response to Elizabeth Sulzby's unfair mischaracterization of the work (beginning with her ludicrous shelving of the piece as "historicalfiction"). As someone trained in the art of history research and writing, a history teacher, and a published historian, I found Cleopatra impressive and an eloquent piece of first-rate scholarship. Schiff [...]


    • Like everyone with even a passing interest in history… I thought I knew a little bit about Cleopatra, but Stacy Schiff's Biography quickly disabused me of that notion! It turned out that like most people, I had taken the oft repeated myths of thousands of years for fact. The most surprising fact I learned was that she was Macedonian and not Egyptian! I was very embarrassed to find out that I had placed both she and Cesar about 1250 years in time before they actually lived! In my judgment, one [...]


    • I have been too long away from non-fiction so this book was a slow and difficult read for me. However, it was definitely worth the read. We all know the story of Cleopatra, a story we've probably been told from novels and/or movies. Cleopatra was a beautiful seductress who loved and manipulated two great men, Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. But she was so much more. She was a Ptolemy. a family who was well known for murdering each other to gain powert she was rare in this family in that she actua [...]


    • I couldn't be more pleased about the resurgence of interest in Cleopatra VII of Egypt. Given that I've spent the past few years of my life working on a trilogy about Cleopatra's daughter starting with Lily of the Nile, I admit a ready bias in favor of Stacy Schiff's new biography. However, I believe that this book would appeal even to those who don't have an obsession with Egypt's most famous monarch.Schiff's tone is easy and breezy--injecting humor and modern comparisons into this survey of the [...]


    • 3 STARS"Though her life spanned fewer than forty years, it reshaped the contours of the ancient world. She was married twice, each time to a brother. She waged a brutal civil war against the first when both were teenagers. She poisoned the second. Ultimately she dispensed with an ambitious sister as well; incest and assassination were family specialties. Cleopatra appears to have had sex with only two men. They happen, however, to have been Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, among the most prominent [...]


    • So my book club read Stacy Schiff's Cleopatra last month.Every single one of the extant sources who wrote about Cleopatra's life had an agenda, specifically to demonize Cleopatra and make hers a name to live in infamyher story is constructed as much of male fear as fantasy.Cicero, Plutarch, Dio, Lucan, Schiff quotes them all extensively and compensates for their obvious bias by attempting to put the reader in that place and time. In this case the "devil" truly is in the details, right down to th [...]


    • The most common feminist approach to Biblical studies begins with the concept of a “hermeneutics of suspicion.” Roughly put, hermeneutics is the theory and principles of interpretation, in this context interpretation of the biblical texts themselves through critical study. A hermeneutics of suspicion approaches the texts with, well, suspicion—that is, it does not take the texts as given but is attentive to what is not said and who is not represented. In a feminist approach, biblical schola [...]


    • It’s a very interesting book. I would say that Schiff's approach to Cleopatra was not only feminist, but also, and possibly foremost, critical. She did not take historians' accounts on their face value; she vigilantly evaluated everything they said, and provided her own commentary. Her images of Cleopatra, Cesar and Mark Anthony are fascinating, and the portrayal of Egyptian, Roman and Middle Eastern society quite eye opening.4.5/5


    • It's amazing what a rich portrait Schiff created when we have so few sources to draw from about Cleopatra's life.


    • "Among the most famous women to have lived, Cleopatra VII ruled Egypt for twenty-two years. She lost a kingdom once, regained it, nearly lost it again, amassed an empire, lost it all. A goddess as a child, a queen at eighteen, a celebrity soon thereafter, she was an object of speculation and veneration, gossip and legend, even in her own time. At the height of her power she controlled virtually the entire eastern Mediterranean coast, the last great kingdom of any Egyptian ruler. For a fleeting m [...]


    • The author clearly loved her subject--but the combination of a serious lack of hard evidence and a writing style I found pretentious significantly diminished my enjoyment of this book. While meticulously researched, the lack of verifiable evidence leads the author to take a series of side-notes that describe, in extensive detail, subjects only tangentially related to Cleopatra. The first half of the book was very difficult to get through because of this; it would perhaps have been better suited [...]


    • I keep falling asleep on this bookway too clinical & dry:( I'm going to keep trying though, as some books get better after 1st couple chapters?Update:It did not get better. The writer seemed to have to keep reminding us that nothing of real fact is known of Cleopatra. Wasn't that kind of the point of her book to give a different perspective (that of a woman writing about a powerful & influential woman)? Which she sort of didbut I would imagine a much more lush, exciting, literary ride fr [...]


    • I have the paperback, but ended up listening to the audio version. This was a rather hard read/listen for me. The book involved much more than Cleopatra, which is understandable since at the beginning of the book it was stated that little is actually known about Cleopatra. Still, I learned quite a bit and found myself Googling her for even more views regarding her life. I came away with much more about her than what I gleaned from the Elizabeth Taylor Hollywood version. From this book, I found h [...]


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