Memoirs of Martinus Scriblerus

Memoirs of Martinus Scriblerus Rich with hilarious episodes Scriblerus is an ingenious satire of false learning and bad taste that has much to say to the pseudo intellectual world of today By taking one ambitious father and his de

  • Title: Memoirs of Martinus Scriblerus
  • Author: Alexander Pope John Arbuthnot John Gay Thomas Parnell Jonathan Swift Charles Kerby-Miller Robert Harley Oxford
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 434
  • Format: Paperback
  • Rich with hilarious episodes, Scriblerus is an ingenious satire of false learning and bad taste that has much to say to the pseudo intellectual world of today By taking one ambitious father and his determination to do everything in his power to produce a child of genius, Pope exposes the true folly of the men of his age and their absurd veneration of the ancients As thisRich with hilarious episodes, Scriblerus is an ingenious satire of false learning and bad taste that has much to say to the pseudo intellectual world of today By taking one ambitious father and his determination to do everything in his power to produce a child of genius, Pope exposes the true folly of the men of his age and their absurd veneration of the ancients As this hallowed child grows into a man, it becomes clear that instead of being the scholar his father so desired, he is simply the inevitable offspring of a laughable generation of pseudo intellectuals and literati.

    • Memoirs of Martinus Scriblerus By Alexander Pope John Arbuthnot John Gay Thomas Parnell Jonathan Swift Charles Kerby-Miller Robert Harley Oxford
      434 Alexander Pope John Arbuthnot John Gay Thomas Parnell Jonathan Swift Charles Kerby-Miller Robert Harley Oxford
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      Posted by:Alexander Pope John Arbuthnot John Gay Thomas Parnell Jonathan Swift Charles Kerby-Miller Robert Harley Oxford
      Published :2019-04-16T11:06:29+00:00


    About “Alexander Pope John Arbuthnot John Gay Thomas Parnell Jonathan Swift Charles Kerby-Miller Robert Harley Oxford

    • Alexander Pope John Arbuthnot John Gay Thomas Parnell Jonathan Swift Charles Kerby-Miller Robert Harley Oxford

      Alexander Pope is generally regarded as the greatest English poet of the eighteenth century, best known for his satirical verse and for his translation of Homer He is the third most frequently quoted writer in the English language, after Shakespeare and Tennyson Pope was a master of the heroic couplet.



    174 thoughts on “Memoirs of Martinus Scriblerus

    • Ένα δοκίμιο του Alexander Pope (1688-1744), του μεγαλύτερου ποιητή της εποχής του, κατά τον Βολταίρο, ο οποίος ήταν μέλος μιας πολιτικοποιημένης λέσχης μαζί με τον Jonathan Swift (Τα ταξίδια του Γκιούλιβερ). Μια σημαντική προσθήκη στην ελληνική βιβλιογραφία.


    • A charming Rabelasian squib, which also looks forward to Tristram Shandy, only written by a bunch of fabulous people instead of one fabulous person. The first few chapters (very proto-Shandyan) are satires on The Learned Man who has no idea what he's doing, and could be of interest to those who dislike mansplaining; Cornelius Scriblerus' advice to his wife and wet-nurse on the art of breast-feeding is particularly hilarious. We all know that guy, although our version of 'that guy' is probably le [...]


    • It's obviously tricky for a 21st century reader to really grasp 18th century satire. I thought I was in for a lengthy read when this book arrived, but discovered most of the book is just notes explaining the inside jokes of the text. Like reading a Stephen Colbert book 100 years from now.There was still a lot I enjoyed, even without jumping back and forth to the notes. The introduction of a father who is determined to employ every means to raise his son to become a man of the arts on par with th [...]


    • Pope reveals the ludicrous nature of relying on ancient knowledge when its application is used without one's own critical thinking for time, place, and context. Humorous yet subtle and satisfying.


    • The satire is a lot more accessible than, say, "Tale of a Tub." The mockery of the legal profession is still pertinent (alas). The text itself is relatively brief and not difficult, although the edition I read had hundreds of pages of explanatory notes. This is a rather delicious irony, when one considers that it was written in mockery of pedantry and academic pettifoggery.I enjoyed it a great deal, although like all compilations, some parts are better than others. The passage about the enthusia [...]


    • Another in the vein of The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman or Augustus Carp, Esq. By Himself Being The Autobiography Of A Really Good Man. It has its moments.


    • Not terribly unreadable, and not altogether boring and trying, and quite Rabelaisian, and quite a surprise enjoyment on the 1,001 Books to Read list. I suppose it's to be expected, considering satire to be an acquired taste, but in the hands of many masters, it's actually not untriumphant a piece of literature.



    • The authorship of this book is somewhat confused, as it came out of an early 17th century literary club. The cover of my copy has the author as Alexander Pope, the title page has Pope and John Arbuthnot as joint authors, and Peter Ackroyd's Foreward says "A great part of this work may confidently be ascribed to Arbuthnot, but the voices of Pope and of Swift are also to be found here".It is a satire on the pretentiousness of higly-educated people whose learning seems to have made them foolish rat [...]


    • Not enjoyable to read. With as many notable authors, I can understand at the time it was written this may have been something, but I am surprised at how they thought creating this story. I did not read all the Whys of how this was written, and so do not understand the importance of what they wrote and made this a story of importance.


    • A hilarious parody on poetic epic failures--or let downs, at least. The satirical inversion of Longinus' treatise on the sublime.


    • Okay the version I read: wasn't this, it was a version from 1950's with no ISBN, so I got as close as I could. There were 3 sections to this book. 1) Introduction this was 86 pages long; 2) the actual story started on 87 and was 86 pages long also; 3) last section notes and appendices started on 173 and went all the way to 387 (which was an index after that). The book was long, boring and imho overrated.


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